My research and that of my students is focused on improving our understanding of large-scale climate variability. The preponderance of my work is based on the analysis and diagnosis of observational data. But it has also exploited simple balance models, idealized general circulation models and the output from coupled chemistry-climate and atmosphere-ocean general circulation models.

In general, my papers are focused on 1) identifying novel aspects of the climate system in observations and 2) testing hypotheses motivated by observational analyses in numerical models. My papers have explored atmospheric variability across a range of spatial and temporal scales, including the origins and impacts of large-scale patterns of climate variability, the mechanisms that underlie observed climate change and the simulated response to external climate forcing, the signatures of and mechanisms for stratosphere/troposphere coupling, ocean/atmosphere interaction in the Southern Hemisphere and North Atlantic, decadal climate variability, and the role of cloud radiative effects in climate variability.

My current research is focused on three primary topics: 1) The influence of radiative forcing due to clouds and water vapor on the dynamics of the extratropical atmospheric circulation; 2) The structure and origins of periodicity in extratropical wave amplitudes (i.e., storminess) on ~20-25 day timescales; and 3) The role of internal climate variability in climate change.

My students' and research scientists' current research projects include:

Please also see the Annular Modes website, which includes basic background material on annular variability: Annular Modes Website

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